Activities : Workshop

Workshop for the Deaf

The Indian Sign Language (ISL) version of Workshop.

Deaf leaders are trained so that they can train the deaf of their associations in their states.

Deaf Women Empowerment Workshop, women are trained to become leaders, guide deaf women, increase knowledge, learn new technology and become empowered. Then they can take workshops in their states.

Deaf Youth Leadership Training - youth is trained to how to be strong in future, advocate with Govt., learn from their experience of NAD leaders as they will be next leaders in next future and help in working of NAD.

UNCRPD training. Explaining different laws in UNCRPD, 50 points so that they can be benefitted from UNCRPD.

RPWD Workshop - Discussion of policies in the bill, discussing the amendments needed, presenting it to the govt. and further teach in different states about it.

Deaf people are trained to stand for their rights. When they see something is wrong, how to file RTIs. Eg. deaf people are thrown out of jobs, land issues, not getting jobs in banks over hearing people. How to file RTI workshops have taken place.

Related Projects

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Location: Auditorium, Free Church, 10 Parliament Street, New Delhi     Projects: Deaf Youth
Workshop on the United Working Together for Elder & Young Deaf People

An event on “Workshop on the United Working Together for Elder and Young Deaf People was held at Auditorium, Free Church, 10 Parliament Street, New Delhi organised by National Association of the Deaf (NAD) on 22nd February, 2017. Among the participants were 35 elder and young deaf people from NCR in the Workshop. The event was chaired by Secretary, Mr. A. S. Narayanan, National Association of the Deaf (NAD) followed by one session which included:-

Leadership and the Importance of Cross-Generation Team-Building by Mr. Kevin Nolan, Director of Operations and Compliance, The Learning Centre for the Deaf, USA:-

The issues addressed during the session included:-

  1. Challenges facing the Delhi Deaf Community Education standards remain low:-
  • Job opportunities limited
  • Continued cultural discrimination and oppression
  • Language deprivation
  • Lack of unification within the Delhi Deaf community
  1. What Went Wrong Here?
  1. What is Leadership?:- "Leadership is a process whereby an individual influences a group of individuals to achieve a common goal." -Tom Northouse
  1. Your job….:-
  • Break up into small groups – no more than 7 people in each groups
  • Discuss top 5 characteristics of GOOD leaders
  • Discuss top 5 characteristics of POOR leaders
  1. Characteristics of Strong Leaders:-
  • Helps people learn
  • Has clear goals and is committed to them
  • Effective communicators***
  • Problem solvers
  • Friendly
  • Honest and trustworthy***
  • Tough, but fair
  • Good listening skills
  1. Extreme Ownership: The Boat Story (Leif Babin and Jocko Willink):-
  • US Navy SEALs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1lgHg0eLko
  • 1 boat crew keeps losing, other keeps winning
  • Switch boat crew leaders
  • Losing boat crew starts catching up – becomes lead boat crew
  • Discuss why that happened?

*THERE ARE NO BAD TEAMS, ONLY BAD LEADERS!*

  1. Crab Theory and the Deaf Community:-
  1. Generational Differences, (Harvard Business Review, Tammy Erickson, March 01, 2009):-
  • Different generations today:-
    1. Traditionalists (born between 1928-1945)
    2. Baby Boomers (born between 1946-1960)
    3. Generation X (born between 1961-1979)
    4. Generation Y (born between 1980-1995)
    5. Millennials (born between 1996-present)
  1. Working Together to Achieve Common Goals:-
  • As a leader, it is YOUR responsibility to work across generations
  • Don’t act like you know everything – each generation brings strengths and weaknesses to the team
  • Learn WHY each generation behaves the way they do
  • Learn new words – each generation has different slang words for different things
  • Be supportive of ALL members of the team
  • Learn the strengths and weaknesses of each of your team members
  • Do not be afraid of change
  1. What’s Next????:-
  • Identify the top 3 challenges the Delhi Deaf Community is facing today
  • As leaders, what will YOU do about those challenges?
  • “You may never know what results come of your actions, but if you do nothing, there will be no results.” – Mahatma Gandhi

Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD gave a vote of thanks to Mr. Kevin Nolan who was deaf excellent lecturer. The programs were of a great success and a great source of encouragement and inspiration to all our 35 deaf delegates from NCR including Delhi, Ghaziabad, Noida, Faridabad, & Gurgaon participated in the Workshop. It had benefited a lot for deaf delegates learning about it. They are very impressed by our Workshop.

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Location: Amity University, Noida    Projects: ISLRTC
Sign Language Program for Students and Staff of Amity University, Noida

National Association of the Deaf Team joined Mrs. Diana Lil Philips (Asst. Professor) from Amity University, Noida addressing the 100 hearing students, professors and staff from Amity University, Noida on 16th February, 2017 at Amity University, Noida. The response was tremendous. The 100 hearing students, professors and staff of Amity University, Noida are keen to implement certain changes in their working. They are willing to include Indian Sign Language as part of their training module to enable hearing students to interact with deaf people who approach them. Mrs. Diana Lil Philips (Asst. Professor), Amity University, Noida hopes for active participation from National Association of the Deaf in the student project on Sign Language in formulating this training module.

The program was organized by Amity University, Noida and around 100 hearing students, professors and staff had attended the event.

Mr. Anuj Jain (Project Director), National Association of the Deaf had given the presentation about Awareness for the Deaf to 100 hearing students, professors and staff of Amity University, Noida. Mr. Shashi Kant (Supervisor), Ms. Sonia Bhatia (Program Officer), Mrs. Ritu Panda (Volunteer), Mr. Raj Kumar Jain (Volunteer), Mr. Shivoy Sharma (Interpreter) & Ms. Sarah Sharma (Interpreter) of National Association of the Deaf taught the very basics of Sign Language to 100 hearing students, professors and staff.

This Sign Language Class sent a powerful message on the importance of promotion of Indian Sign language to Professors, Staff and Students of Amity University, Noida.

Dr. Jayanti Pujari, Director of Amity Institute of Rehablitation Science, Amity University, Noida gave the 5 gifts of Tulsi Pots to Mr. Anuj Jain, Mr. Shashi Kant, Mr. Raj Kumar Jain, Ms. Sonia Bhatia and Mrs. Ritu Panda.

Dr. Jayanti Pujari, Director of Amity Institute of Rehablitation Science said she would like to work together with the NAD to conduct the Sign Language Program for Students of Amity University in the future. They were interested in learning the Sign Language and spread awareness about it. They hope to also help the deaf communities in India.

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Location: India Habitat Centre, Lodi Road, New Delhi    Projects: Awareness
Disability Inclusion Across 17 Sustainable Development Goals

National Centre for Promotion of Employment for Disabled People (NCPEDP) and American India Foundation (AIF) co-organised the Disability Inclution Across 17 Sustainable Development Goals in partnership with Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (Divyangjan), Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment and United Nations India on 9th December, 2016 at Juniper, India Habitat Centre, Lodi Road, New Delhi.

Inaugural Session: Setting the Stage:-

  • Javed Abidi, Honorary Director, NCPEDP
  • Nishant Pandey, Country Director, American India Foundation (AIF)
  • Yuri Afansiev, UN Resident Coordinator & UNDP Resident Representative in India
  • Shri Thaawar Chand Gehlot, Hon’ble Minister for Social Justice & Empowerment

 Taking Stock: Where are we after one year?:-

  • Chair:- Mr. Javed Abidi, Hononary Director, NCPEDP

Panelist:-

  • Ankit Rajiv Jindal, Marketing Advisor, NIT DATA Services, Founding Director, Diversity and Equal Opportunity Centre (DEOC)
  • Deepali Kapoor, Program Head, Pratham
  • Amitabh Behar, Executive Director, National Foundation for India (NFI)

Poverty elimination: How will it happen when 20% of the world’s poorest are people with disabilities and we continue to neglect them?:-

Chair:- Mr. Amarjeet Sinha, Secretary, Department of Rural Development (DRD), Ministry of Rural Development

Panelist:-

  • Praveen Kumar G., Head of Programmes, VSO India Trust
  • Sandeep Chachra, Executive Director, ActionAid (India)
  • Madhu Khatri, Associate General Counsel, Microsoft Corporation India Pvt. Ltd.
  • Rajiv Khandelwal, Co-Founder & Executive Director, Aajeevika Bureau

Inclusion of disability in the national development agenda: The way Forward:-

            Chair:- Mr. N. S. Kang, Secretary, Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (Divyangjan), MSJE

Panelist:-

  • Rema Nagarajan, Senior Assistant Editor, Times of India
  • Manas Satpathy, Executive Director, PRADAN
  • Nandita Bhan, Research Scientist & Adjunet Assistant Professor, Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI)
  • Arjun Sanyal, Director, Education (Learning and Migration Program), American India Foundation

Goal 1 of the SDGs is – End Poverty in all its forms everywhere. Goal 3 which focuses on health and well being is - Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages. There is such an intrinsic relationship between poverty, health and disability that it is blasphemous to note that disability has not been mentioned in not only these two goals but also their targets and indicators. Here’s how they are related:

Poverty and Disability – 800 million of the world's 1 billion people with disabilities live in the countries of the Global South. People with disabilities also comprise 20 percent of the world's poorest. People with disabilities not only are more vulnerable to poverty but their poverty is compounded by other inequalities. For instance, a person with disability has far lesser chances of education and thus lesser chances of employment.

Health and Disability - People with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to deficiencies in health care services. They may experience greater vulnerability to secondary conditions, co-morbid conditions, and age-related conditions often engaging in health risk behaviors. It is therefore imperative that when one talks of healthcare, it must include all assistive devices and technologies that are essential for the inclusion of persons with disabilities in their daily lives.

We are beginning a dialogue with relevant stakeholders to ensure disability is not left out of the global agenda again.

NITI Ayog has been entrusted with the role of coordinating the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Their task is not to merely collect data on SDGs but to act proactively to fructify the goals and targets not only quantitatively but also while maintaining high standards of quality.

NITI Ayog will create a vision document for about 15 years i.e. upto 2030. It is now up to us to ensure that disability is not left out of this very important document. Have you read through the SDGs? Do you have any specific recommendations for NITI Ayog?

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Location: Delhi Police    Projects: Awareness
Sign Language Training Program for Deaf

Sign Language Program for Delhi Police Station Police Lines, Rajpur Road, Civil Lines, Delhi on 23rd November, 2016 National Association of the Deaf Team joined the Delhi Police Station in addressing Delhi Police personnel on the 23rd November, 2016 at Delhi Police Station at Police Lines, Rajpur Road, Civil Lines, Delhi. The response was tremendous and the Delhi police is keen to implement certain changes in their working. They are willing to include Indian Sign Language as part of their training module to enable police personnel to interact with deaf and mute people who approach them. Police Official from Delhi Police Station hope for active participation from National Association of The Deaf in our student project on Sign Language in formulating this training module. Delhi Police is also preparing a list of official interpreters with their contact details to be handed to the Commissioner, Delhi Police that could be circulated to all the police stations for ready reference. Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of National Association of the Deaf talked about the problems deaf individuals face while dealing with police personnel & the issues related to effective handling of cases of violence against deaf persons while presenting at an Orientation session on “The Need for the Police Redressal of Grievances of Deaf and the Use of Sign Language”. The program was organized by Delhi Police and attended by around 1100 Police Personnel and ACP, DCP had attended the event.

Mr. Anuj Jain (Joint Secretary), Ms. Sonia Bhatia (Program Officer), Ms. Surbhi Taneja (Interpreter) of National Association of the Deaf showed our skits about robbery and rape. The skit was performed in a contrasting manner where one was acted out without the assistance on a sign language interpreter and the second scenario was with an interpreter. The contrast was visible to all the cadets. The confusion, misunderstandings that existed in the first scenario due to communication gap between the police officer and victim and that gap was solved through the presence of a sign language interpreter in the second scenario. This skit sent a powerful message on the importance of promotion of Indian Sign language.

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Location:     Projects: Education
N.A.D Consultation on Deaf Education

The National Association of the Deaf held its first and pioneering Consultation on Deaf Education at the Indian International Centre on Thursday 9th February. This was a unique conference and perhaps the first of its kind in India. Government officials, NGOs and experts in the field sat alongside deaf community members in order to discuss education of the deaf from a new and fresh perspective: the Deaf Perspective. Not only did this workshop offer an opportunity to debate and discuss new ideas, it also opened minds and paved the way for future developments in the field of Deaf Education.

The two presentations of the day were led by Dr. Surinder Randhawa from Rourkee, who presented on the current status of Deaf Education in India and the issues of concern and Dr. Madan Vasishta from Gallaudet University, who shared his vision about choices that should be made available to all deaf children at various ages.

Each session was followed by an open floor discussion and at the end of the day all participants at the conference culminated their thoughts and ideas in order to compile a position paper on Deaf Education, chartering a plan for further action. Several valuable points and recommendations were raised.

  • The need for a mass awareness campaign promoting sign language and the rights of deaf people in general.
  • That communication and the role of information were of vital importance and that early intervention was essential, targeting parents of deaf children as well as sensitising Doctors to deafness and the issues involved
  • The need for networking and the sharing of skills, ideas and experience.
  • The need to evolve a credible assessment system to evaluate, assess and certify trainers and trainers of trainers.
  • The necessity to introduce sign language into the education of deaf children in special schools as well as being included in the school curriculum for all
  • The role of interpreters emphasised as being fundamental for a deaf person to be able to fully participate in society
  • The need to have more sign language courses available.

Moreover, it was stressed that this should all be done with participation of deaf people as the first precondition:

"Deaf persons themselves need to be included and involved in this process in an important way while making decisions at all levels."

Location: RGNIYD, Regional Centre, Chandigarh     Projects: Awareness
Workshop on Advocacy Leadership Training for the Deaf

Around 50 deaf delegates from North India attended a three-day workshop. The first day began with the introductory session addressed by Shri Stanzin Dawa, Regional Coordinator, RGNIYD, Regional Centre Chandigarh, which gave the deaf participants a brief outlook of the topic "Leadership & Advocacy" and the role it played in our lives. During the workshop, core aspects of leadership are clearly defined and explained through various team building activities, group discussions, indoor-outdoor exercises by the mentors.

Shri Uday Bhaskar, Trainer from the Deaf Enabled Foundation, Hyderabad (Telangana) shared the detailed information about leadership styles, theories and attributes of successful leaders, levels of maturity, skills & competencies. Examples of key lessons learnt from famous historical figure like Mahatma Gandhi who was the preeminent leader of the Indian independence movement in British-ruled India.

Importance of water conservation has been addressed by Dr. Jigmet Yangchan, Junior Scientist, HMAARI from Ladakh, to protect the water environment and to meet current and future human demand. The goals of water conservation efforts include:-
1. Ensuring availability of water for future generations.
2. Energy conservation
3. Water saving technology for the home chores.

The team members of RGNIYD conducted a different sessions on Johari Window which is a technique used to help people better understand their relationship with themselves as well as others. During the exercise, subjects are given a list of a few adjectives out of which they need to pick some that they feel describe their own personality. The eight-step process on grassroots advocacy was also discussed to develop a strategy to advocate for a change. An Interpreter bridged the communication gap between deaf participants and facilitators through Sign Language. 

Participants were also made familiar with the various tools and the power point presentation which will be used for deaf empowerment in community. The focus was on the topic of "SWOT" (Strength, weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) and group discussions. The workshop concluded with the aim of sharing the knowledge with others to increase the team building qualities in deaf community. Certificate of Participation (COP) along with group photograph has been distributed to all the participants. Addressing the participants, Shri Stanzin Dawa of the RGNIYD said, "Your circumstances should not define your limitations; rather they should help you to redefine your potential and the power within you to make things possible."

Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development (RGNIYD), Regional Centre, Chandigarh in collaboration with National Association of the Deaf (NAD).

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Location: Indian Social Institute, Lodi Road,New Delhi     Projects: Awareness Deaf Women
International Women’s Day

An event on “Women empowerment day” was held at Indian Social Institute organised by National Association of the Deaf (NAD) on 8th March, 2016. Among the participants were 125 deaf women members/non-members and husbands of the married deaf women. The event was chaired by Women Secretary, Mrs. Geeta Sharma, National Association of the Deaf (NAD) followed by three sessions which included:-

  1. “Women Empowerment in India” by Ms. Sangeeta Singh, Ph.D Scholar, Delhi University Women Empowerment in India

The issues addressed during the session included:-

  • Meaning of women empowerment
  • Obstacles in empowering women in India
  • Gender inequalities across the world
  • Ways to empower women. The primary focus was to acquaint with the various hindrances that restrict the social and economic growth of women in Indian context. Focusing on the gender gap in literacy, emphasis was given on the causes that impede the education of a girl child. A short movie, “Nischay” was presented to highlight the ways by which women are abused in their day to day life. The later part of the movie illustrated need of the hour to raise their voice against violence. The speaker also put forward the various facts about the gender inequalities prevailing in the society globally. The key points were discussed on “How can we empower ourselves?” which included educational, social, psychological and health related aspects for the better development of a woman in the society. It was added by presenting stories about the true spirit of Indian women who achieved their goals irrespective of their socioeconomic and disability status and set themselves as role models in today’s society. The session was concluded by what a great personality, Swami Vivekanand said, “There is no chance for the welfare of the world unless the condition of women is improved, It is not possible for a bird to fly on only one wing.” 
  1. “Knowledge of Deaf Women” by Ms. Priya Reddy & Ms. Harpriti Reddy, Coordinator, The Deaf Way Foundation.

The participants were taken to Crafts Museum, New Delhi after the sessions were over. The purpose was fun for them to enjoy with each others at Crafts Museum, New Delhi.

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District Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

We organized the second kind of the District Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) on 6th March 2016 at Abohar, Punjab between 9:30 am to 5:00 pm. There were about 85 deaf delegates from all over Abohar, Punjab attended the workshop for one day.

Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of National Association of the Deaf presented the different PowerPoint Presentations about the Human Rights on Video, the human rights/laws, & UNCRPD. We created an awareness on UNCRPD to help deaf people understand and know the laws and rights of the deaf. It helps to empower them to do themselves by their own decision in their lives in India. 

A milestone for the advocacy of the rights of persons with disabilities is now steadily gaining worldwide acceptance and support. This is known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) refers to a document focusing on international human rights of people with disabilities. It was created by the United Nations and is being monitored by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. 

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 13, 2006. The Convention was opened for signature on March 30, 2007. It then came into force on May 3, 2008, after the Convention’s ratification by the 20th party. There are a total of 71 countries that have ratified the convention. Some of the countries that have ratified the Convention include Australia, Belgium, China, India, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, and United Kingdom and Northern Ireland. The UN.org website has a section where interested groups and individuals can read the latest developments regarding the convention. 

The Convention intends to ensure equal rights to people with disabilities. This is done by elaborating in detail the rights of persons with disabilities and setting out a code of implementation. 

Guiding Principles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities:-

Eight principles form the base for the Convention and the articles included in it. Below are the guiding principles:

  • Respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy including the freedom to make one's own choices, and independence of persons
  • Non-discrimination
  • Full and effective participation and inclusion in society
  • Respect for difference and acceptance of persons with disabilities as part of human diversity and humanity
  • Equality of opportunity
  • Accessibility
  • Equality between men and women
  • Respect for the evolving capacities of children with disabilities and respect for the right of children with disabilities to preserve their identities 

India ratified UNCRPD on the 1st of October, 2007. India was the 7th country in the world and the first significant country to do so. The ratification of UNCRPD was a direct result of the advocacy by NCPEDP and Disabled Rights Group (DRG).

UNCRPD is an international instrument that provides persons with disabilities the same human rights that everyone else enjoys. It marks a radical shift in defining and understanding disability - it moves from a medical/social perspective to a human-rights based approach.

However, UNCRPD is just a paper if it is not implemented. Disabled people have to play an active role in the implementation and monitoring of UNCRPD.

NCPEDP has therefore launched an advocacy initiative for speedy implementation of UNCRPD in India.

650 million people, roughly 10 per cent of the world's population, live with a disability, according to the United Nations. In India alone, there are roughly 100 million people with disabilities, which is almost 1/6th of population of disabled people in the world.

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District Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

We organized the second kind of the District Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) on 5th March 2016 at Muktsar, Punjab between 9:30 am to 5:00 pm. There were about 85 deaf delegates from all over Muktsar, Punjab attended the workshop for one day.

Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of National Association of the Deaf presented the different PowerPoint Presentations about the Human Rights on Video, the human rights/laws, & UNCRPD. We created an awareness on UNCRPD to help deaf people understand and know the laws and rights of the deaf. It helps to empower them to do themselves by their own decision in their lives in India. 

A milestone for the advocacy of the rights of persons with disabilities is now steadily gaining worldwide acceptance and support. This is known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) refers to a document focusing on international human rights of people with disabilities. It was created by the United Nations and is being monitored by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. 

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 13, 2006. The Convention was opened for signature on March 30, 2007. It then came into force on May 3, 2008, after the Convention’s ratification by the 20th party. There are a total of 71 countries that have ratified the convention. Some of the countries that have ratified the Convention include Australia, Belgium, China, India, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, and United Kingdom and Northern Ireland. The UN.org website has a section where interested groups and individuals can read the latest developments regarding the convention. 

The Convention intends to ensure equal rights to people with disabilities. This is done by elaborating in detail the rights of persons with disabilities and setting out a code of implementation.

Guiding Principles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities:-

Eight principles form the base for the Convention and the articles included in it. Below are the guiding principles:

  • Respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy including the freedom to make one's own choices, and independence of persons
  • Non-discrimination
  • Full and effective participation and inclusion in society
  • Respect for difference and acceptance of persons with disabilities as part of human diversity and humanity
  • Equality of opportunity
  • Accessibility
  • Equality between men and women
  • Respect for the evolving capacities of children with disabilities and respect for the right of children with disabilities to preserve their identities

India ratified UNCRPD on the 1st of October, 2007. India was the 7th country in the world and the first significant country to do so. The ratification of UNCRPD was a direct result of the advocacy by NCPEDP and Disabled Rights Group (DRG).

UNCRPD is an international instrument that provides persons with disabilities the same human rights that everyone else enjoys. It marks a radical shift in defining and understanding disability - it moves from a medical/social perspective to a human-rights based approach.

However, UNCRPD is just a paper if it is not implemented. Disabled people have to play an active role in the implementation and monitoring of UNCRPD.

NCPEDP has therefore launched an advocacy initiative for speedy implementation of UNCRPD in India.

650 million people, roughly 10 per cent of the world's population, live with a disability, according to the United Nations. In India alone, there are roughly 100 million people with disabilities, which is almost 1/6th of population of disabled people in the world.

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Location: Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Regional Centre, Sector- 12, Chandigarh    Projects: Awareness Deaf Women Deaf Youth
Workshop on the Advocacy Leadership Training for the Deaf

National Association of the Deaf organised the Workshop on the Advocacy Leadership Training for the Deaf at Rajiv Gandhi National Institute of Youth Development, Regional Centre, Sector-12, Chandigarh on 23rd January, 2016.

The function started with the welcome note by Mr. Yogesh Kumar, Public Relation Officer of NAD. Chief Guest of Shri Vijay Kumar Dev, Advisor to the Administrator Chandigarh has spoken about the works of NAD and said  he will provide government jobs to deaf people, he said them that they would give their letters to him and he will solve their problems. He said Yogesh Kumar always contacts with me.

Guest of Honour Shri Phool Chand Yadav, Commissioner for Disabilities, Minister of Social Justice & Empowerment, Government of Haryana, spoke to the deaf delegates that they don’t think they are disabled people; when he was small child & he did not think that he was disabled person. He also said, “I don’t think that I am disabled person but now I am a commissioner for disabilities.”

Guest of Honour Shri Nitin Rokade, Chief HR Manager, Indian Oil Company Limited, Chandigarh spoke to the deaf delegates that they have problems to share with him and he would solve your problems.

Shri A. S. Narayanan, Secretary of National Association of the Deaf explained to them how victory NAD got the ISLRTC as an autonomous body by PM’s approval on 22nd September 2015 during the International Week of the Deaf.

Mrs. Geeta Sharma, Women Secretary of NAD and Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD shared explaining the importance of advocacy for Govt. for demanding the human rights in areas of lives of deaf people.

Mr. Vivek Mehta, Chief Technology Officer, deafeasy explained to deaf delegates regarding the importance of technology for the deaf people through the alarm device help deaf people for vibrant waking up themselves easily.

There were about 85 deaf delegates participated in the Workshop from Chandigarh, Punjab, Haryana & Himachal Pradesh.

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Location: Govt. Senior Secondary School for the Deaf, Kalkaji, New Delhi     Projects: Education
NAD Worked Together With V-Shesh  for Learning English Skills

Mrs. Rashi, V-Shesh invited Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of National Association of the Deaf to share with the 100 Deaf students of Govt Senior Secondary School for the Deaf, Kalkaji, New Delhi on 27 November 2015, Friday morning. He talked to them about Learning English Skills. V-Shesh will start to support in teaching the English Skills Class to them every Monday to Friday 830am to 1030am from US AID support. NAD wished V-Shesh for succees in its goal for the Deaf. She is happy to know that NAD will work together with V-Shesh for the Learning English Skills.

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Location: India Habit Centre, Lodi Road    Projects: Accessibility ISLRTC
Workshop on Indian Sign Language for 25 Hearing Employees of Hans Foundation

NCPEDP invited Asha Singha (Interpreter) and Zorin Singha, President of NAD to give lecture to 25 Employees of Hans Foundation about history of NAD at India Habitat Centre, Lodi Road, New Delhi on 17th November, 2015. Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD was also invited to teach the Indian Sign Language classes to 25 Employees of Hans Foundation for two days on 17-18 November 2015 at the same location.

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Location: Auditorium, Fr. Agnel School, Gautam Nagar, New Delhi    Projects: Deaf Youth
State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth 58th International Week of The Deaf Celebration-15

We have also been able to successfully conduct the State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth at Auditorium, Fr. Agnel School, Gautam Nagar, Delhi on 20th September, 2015.

The seminar started with the welcome note by Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD. Ms. Rupmani Chettari, NAD’s North India Deaf Women Committee & Deaf Youth Team of NAD shared the powerpoint presentation about International Week of Deaf “With Sign Language Rights, Our Children Can!”. Members of Noida Deaf Friendship Club & Delhi Deaf Friendship Club showed their different skits and Mime about hearing parents of deaf child and Deaf parents of deaf child.

Chief Guest Mr. Onkar Sharma, General Secretary of All India Federation of the Deaf, Guest of Honour Mr. Suresh Prakash, Treasurer of All India Federation of the Deaf and Guest of Honour Mr. Suresh Ahuja, Executive Member of AIFD are invited in the Workshop. They spoke about NAD is the best advocacy organization for demanding Govt. for our human rights for the deaf.

Mr. A. S. Narayanan, Secretary of NAD shared the powerpoint presentation about history of Indian Sign Language Research & Training Centre. Mr. Sachin Singh, Member of NAD shared powerpoint presentation about United Nations at USA.

Ms. Ritu Panda, Member of NAD shared powerpoint presentation about visiting the Regional South Asia World Federation of the Deaf.

Mr. Rahul Garg, Assistant Coordinator of NAD shared powerpoint presentation about Understanding Deaf Children. There are about 250 deaf young people from NCR participated in the Workshop. They are very impressed by our workshop.

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Location: Rajindra Place, New Delhi    Projects: Awareness
Sign Language Program for Delhi Police Station

National Association of the Deaf Team joined the students from Cluster Innovation Centre (CIC), University of Delhi in addressing Delhi Police Officers on 30th July, 2015 at Police Station, Rajindra Place, New Delhi. The response was tremendous and the Delhi police are keen to implement certain changes in their working. They are willing to include Indian Sign Language as part of their training module to enable police personnel to interact with deaf and mute people who approach them. Mrs. Sukrita Paul Kumar, Programme Coordinator, CIC University of Delhi hope for active participation from National Association of the Deaf in our student project on Sign Language in formulating this training module. CIC is also preparing a list of official interpreters with their contact details to be handed to the Commissioner, Delhi Police that could be circulated to all the police stations for ready reference.

The program was organized by Cluster Innovation Centre of the University of Delhi (CIC) and attended by around 100 Police Officers had attended the event.

Mr. Sanjay Taneja, Member of NAD and Ms. Riya Taneja (Interpreter) of NAD taught the Sign Language Class to 100 Police Officers also they performed a skit on common incidents like robbery and rape. The skit was performed in a contrasting manner where one was acted out without the assistance on a sign language interpreter and the second scenario was with an interpreter. The contrast was visible to all the cadets. The confusion, misunderstandings that existed in the first scenario due to communication gap between the police officer and victim and that gap was solved through the presence of a sign language interpreter in the second scenario. This skit sent a powerful message on the importance of promotion of Indian Sign language.

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Location: PHD Chamber of Commerce & Industry, PHD House, Sector 31-A, Chandigarh    Projects: Deaf Youth
State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth

We have also been able to successfully conduct the State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth at Auditorium, PHD Chamber of Commerce & Industry, PHD House, Sector 31-A, Chandigarh on 5th July, 2015

The seminar started with the welcome note by Mr. Yogesh Kumar, Public Relation Officer of NAD and Mr. Dilip Jangir, Executive Member (a unit of Rajasthan) of NAD. Mr. A. S. Narayanan, Secretary of NAD talked to the audience that he shared the problems of human rights for the deaf in India and ISLTRC. Mr. Rahul Garg, NAD’s Deaf Youth Team and Mr. Rahul Jain, Speaking Hands Institute for the Deaf explained the meaning of the attitude PowerPoint presentation. Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD explained about the importance of the attitude in deaf people's lives need to be changed. Shared how much they took their time to learn themself being better then they could help deaf others.

Chief Guest Sh. Vijay Kumar Dev, Advisor Of Administrator, Chandigarh spoke about sending the ISLTRC as an autonomous body proposal to PMO and supported to work with NAD.

Mr. Rahul Garg , NAD's Deaf Youth Team organized a one on one question-answer round where N.A.D. was supposed to answer questions asked by the participants, any questions regarding their functioning, administration, fundraising, etc. This session led to trust building between the organization and its members. There are about 175 deaf young people from Chandigarh, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab & Haryana participated in the Workshop. They are a lot of excitement by our workshop.

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Location: Rajindra Place, New Delhi    Projects: Accessibility Awareness
Sign Language Program for Delhi Police Station

National Association of the Deaf Team joined the students from Cluster Innovation Centre (CIC), University of Delhi in addressing Delhi Police Officers on 30th April, 2015 at Police Station, Rajindra Place, New Delhi. The response was tremendous and the Delhi police are keen to implement certain changes in their working. They are willing to include Indian Sign Language as part of their training module to enable police personnel to interact with deaf and mute people who approach them. Mrs. Sukrita Paul Kumar, Programme Coordinator, CIC University of Delhi hope for active participation from National Association of the Deaf in our student project on Sign Language in formulating this training module. CIC is also preparing a list of official interpreters with their contact details to be handed to the Commissioner, Delhi Police that could be circulated to all the police stations for ready reference.

The program was organized by Cluster Innovation Centre of the University of Delhi (CIC) and attended by around 100 Police Officers had attended the event.

Ms. Sonia Bhatia (Program Officer), Ms. Surbhi Taneja (Interpreter) and Ms. Riya Taneja (Interpreter) of National Association of the Deaf taught the Sign Language Class to 100 Police Officers also they performed a skit on common incidents like robbery and rape. The skit was performed in a contrasting manner where one was acted out without the assistance on a sign language interpreter and the second scenario was with an interpreter. The contrast was visible to all the cadets. The confusion, misunderstandings that existed in the first scenario due to communication gap between the police officer and victim and that gap was solved through the presence of a sign language interpreter in the second scenario. This skit sent a powerful message on the importance of promotion of Indian Sign language.

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Location: Cardinal Parecatil Memorial Renewal Centre, Azad Road, Kaloor, Emakulam, Kochi    Projects: Deaf Women
6th National Deaf Women Empowerment Seminar PROTECT DEAF WOMEN AND GIRL COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY

We organised the 6th National Deaf Empowerment Seminar starting off on 18th & 19th April 2015 from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm with over 100 women participating from New Delhi, Telangana, various districts of Kerala & Tamil Nadu. It was indeed a sight to see with women in colorful attire reflecting the diverse culture and tradition of India, signing and communicating excitedly, as for some, this was their first ever Seminar and opportunity to meet deaf women from other parts of India. Dr. Surinder Randhawa, Senior Consultant, BAASLS Programme, Smt. Geeta Sharma, Secretary, National Association of the Deaf, Ms. Janaki, People with Hearing Impairment Network, Hyderabad, Mrs. Theresa, Women Secretary, Regional Women Deaf Centre, Tamaraserry, Calicut, Mrs. Renuka Rameshan, Director, Family Care, Coimbatore Sign language Professional Interpreter, inaugurated the 2-day Seminar by lighting the lamp, which was followed by presentations that made everyone take a deep look at each of their lives thus far and see what can be done through empowerment.

We invited the chairperson of Keral Commission for Women but they couldn’t make it to the workshop as they were travelling to Meghalaya for some other workshop.

Dr. Surinder Randhawa’s presentation, “Protecting Deaf women in India. Communication is the key set the tone for the 2-day Seminar. Digging deep into the mindsets of male chauvinistic society about women in India, many truths were revealed, urging deaf women to fight back and not have to suffer silently anymore, given the fact that anything that happens to a deaf woman is silent, and hence there is need for protection and time to make the voices heard.

Technology has been a boon to the deaf community and has helped communication system and dissemination of information in visual mode. Presentation by Smt. Renuka Rameshan, Director of Family Care, covered technology available to protect deaf women and girls and also provided tips on how to be wise in using social media and share knowledge that helps in personal and professional growth. Information about the latest mobile apps such as himmat, launched by Delhi Police for safety of women, and fight back launched by Tech Mahindra, originally for in-house, but made public after Delhi gang rape incident, were extremely helpful for the deaf women and the apps are deaf-friendly as with the press of a button, help can be accessed.

Smt. Geeta Sharma, Secretary, Women's Wing of NAD, stated a few problems faced by deaf community such as lack of interpreters and thereby lack of accessibility, lack of job opportunities, poor education facilities etc., and sought the support of the Government.

The question and answer session saw the interacting capacity of the attendees and many valuable suggestions were given. Shirley Somasundaram, Malayalam dramatist famous personality in the theatre field, paid a visit to the seminar hall to view the action and was impressed with the goings on and congratulated the participants along with the head of Cardinal Parecattil Memorial Renewal Centre, who also said a blessing for the deaf women and families present. A short boating trip was arranged for all to enjoy them and bond together in the evening. Day 2 of the Conference included an hour of education on the laws that every deaf woman should know and be aware of such as free legal aid, the power to decide, the right to interpreter, human rights, etc., after which an hour of group discussion was slotted for the participants to suggest changes and a plan of action to be proposed to the National Commission for Women Government authorities. Various points of debate and ideas were generated through this time. Smt. Janaki, Director of People with Hearing Impairment Network (PHIN) briefed everyone about the activities of the organization, reaching out to many deaf women and seeking legal help in situations where the hearing perpetrators needed to be brought to book and cited many case studies, which was a boost to many.

Domanic Presentation, MLA of Kochi, Ernakulam, spared a few minutes from his busy schedule to meet the participants and address them, wish them and congratulate them. One of the youngest participants, a final year college student, presented an eye-opening session on the tools to empower, namely, training, positive thinking, communication skills, education, leadership, teamwork, interaction between hearing and deaf community, self development, etc.

The vote of thanks was given by Nirupma Kaul, Deaf Women Committee, National Association of the Deaf summarizing the whole event. After thanking all the distinguished guests and participants, each city / town was presented with a set of information books published by National Commission for Women which included Problems relating to NRI marriage, Prevention of sexual harassment at work place, Aspiration rites relationship marriage and Meera Didi se pooch, to help understand the present day problems faced by women and know how to overcome them.

It was observed that the participants found the 2 days seminar really fruitful. When the feedback was taken from the participants it was found that most participants didn't know about the basic rights of women and it was their first hands on experience to attend such a seminar and attain knowledge about their rights. Many deaf women shared about their discriminatory experiences and they were counseled on how and why they should stand up for their rights.

From the great output received from the deaf women, we hope that more such workshops can be conducted for deaf women and their stand and betterment in the society can be considered seriously. We hope that the Govt. of our country and state administration will keep supporting us like they always have. From the suggestions we received, one of the suggestion which was commonly given by the participants was if Govt. experts in this area would come and meet deaf women and understand them closely and impart their knowledge about the rights of women to them.

Since the workshop was a lot based on how technology so recommendations were made to seek financial and intellectual assistance on how interpreter services via video conferencing can be made accessible to deaf women. Video conferencing services would solve a lot of problems for not only urban women but also rural women as communication is one big barrier for the deaf community.

Sign language plays a major role in the life of any deaf individual as it is their first language and their only mode of communication. But sadly it doesn't get the same status as any other language. Making sign language the official language of our country would solve the major problem of the deaf community. The education is very poor for the deaf as a. deaf schools aren't enough b. teachers teaching in deaf schools themselves don't know sign language themselves. When the very base is so weak then how can we expect the deaf to walk equally with normal world. Deaf women and girls at a major level are victims of sexual abuse and rape but their cases are never taken into action because they aren't able to express themselves cause of communication barrier and lack of interpreters. The sad truth is in India there are only 250 professional sign language interpreters for 18 million deaf people. Therefore, our only appeal is to promote sign language in our country and make it an official language. This in a major way will solve the problems of deaf women ‘deaf pride’ can be promoted.

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Location: Indian Social Institute, Lodi Road, New Delhi    Projects: Deaf Women
NATIONAL WORKSHOP ON EMPOWERMENT OF DEAF WOMEN

The National Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Women was held on 14th December, 2014 in New Delhi organised by National Association of the Deaf. It was a half day workshop on empowerment of deaf women from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Smt. Geeta Sharma is a deaf person and also, the woman secretary of National Association of the Deaf, New Delhi. She starts the workshop every 3 month to conduct the workshop for deaf women for NCR/Delhi.

Ms. Michelle Morris from USA made various presentations referring to deaf women. Deaf women leaders attended the workshop from all over the country. Most were enthusiastic and keen to have learnt things presented by Smt. Nirupama Kaul who is a Committee Women member of NAD.

Programme was held in order to raise awareness and create a positive space in society for the deaf community and women's issues. 65 deaf women leaders attended the workshop in Delhi.

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Location: Carmel Mount School, Sector 47, Chandigarh    Projects: Awareness
Workshop on the Kids of Deaf Adults Workshop (KODA)

National Association of the Deaf organised the Kids of Deaf Adults Workshop (KODA) on 13th December, 2014 at Auditorium, Carmel Mount School, Sector 47, Chandigarh. Over 15 kids of deaf adults & 65 deaf adults participated in this workshop which was led by Mr. Sanjay Taneja, (President of Noida Deaf Friendship Club) & Ms. Surbhi Taneja, (Sign Language Interpreter).

Both Mr. Sanjay Taneja & Ms. Surbi Taneja took a session with kids of deaf adults (KODA) discussing how the deaf world and hearing world is different and children bridge that gap. Children had their doubts cleared, had some back and forth questions for their parents moderate by Ms. Surbhi Taneja.

This workshop took a more practical approach with a lot of brainstorming which had left a positive impact on our hearing children and we hope that next one would be the same kind and better!

Mayor of Chandigarh, Sh. Harphool Chand Kalyan grace the event as Chief Guest. These Deaf Parents and their children are really inspiration for all of us in the society. With the Disability also, they are working hard in their life, to earn their living and upbringing of their children, said Sh. Kalyan.

Municipal Corporation, Chandigarh is committed to extend full support to the NGO’s and organisations who are working for the development and upliftment of handicaps in the society.

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Location: Auditorium, Fr. Agnel School, Gautam Nagar, New Delhi    Projects: Awareness
57th International Week of The Deaf Celebration 2014 - State Level Workshop

We have also been able to successfully conduct the State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth at Auditorium, Fr. Agnel School, Gautam Nagar, Delhi on 21st September, 2014.

The seminar started with the welcome note by Ms. Nirupama Kaul, Co-Worker of NAD’s North India Deaf Women Committee. Mr. Zorin Singha, President of NAD started the keynote with the deaf young people in the workshop. Mr. Rishikesh Anand, Deaf Youth Team of NAD shared the powerpoint presentation about the reports of NAD’s Activities 2005 to 2014. Mr. Rahul Garg, NAD’s Deaf Youth Team explained the meaning of the Strengthening Human Diversity. Members of Noida Deaf Friendship Club & Delhi Deaf Friendship Club showed their different skits. Ms. Rupmani Chettari, Co-Worker of NAD’s North India Deaf Women Committee shared her powerpoint presentation about International Day of the Deaf. There are about 350 deaf young people from NCR participated in the Workshop. They are very impressed by our workshop.

One of the major goals of NAD is State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth creating awareness about the problems of the Deaf and hard of hearing young persons in India and creating more deaf young leaders to become the NAD Leaders. Toward this end, NAD is working with various Deaf organizations of India such to meet common goals.

NAD is imparting the State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth to empower the deaf young people and enable them to stand up for their rights. This helps the Deaf community to become more participative in social and legal matters that concern them as citizens.

State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth helps the Deaf Young Persons when they have to interact with Deaf Leaders & Govt. Officials and when they need to approach the authorities for needs. It helps remove their fear of authorities and helps them access and utilize their rights to life so they can live fearlessly as citizens.

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Location: Govt. Medical Hospital & College, Saral Building, Sector-32, Chandigarh    Projects: Accessibility Awareness
57th International Week of the Deaf Celebration 2014

57th International Week of the Deaf Celebration 2014 on 21st September, 2014 i.e. on Sunday was organized at Govt. Medical Hospital & College, Saral Building, Sector-32, Chandigarh. 550 deaf people from different districts of Punjab gathered at Govt. Medical Hospital & College, Chandigarh for the celebration of 57th International Week of the Deaf on Sunday. 2nd Punjab Deaf Conference was also organized by National Association of the Deaf on the topic "Strengthening Human Diversity".

Shri Satya Pal Jain, Ex-Member of Parliament, BJP from Chandigarh was invited as Chief Guest and Guest of Honour Shri Deepak Sharma (Cell BJP, Chandigarh).

The function started with the welcome note by Mr. Yogesh Kumar, Public Relation Officer of NAD. Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD spoke the problems for the deaf in India to deaf audience.

Speaking on the occasion, Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD said there is no college is being set up by the Government. Govt. should help the deaf of Punjab and should provide them jobs for reserved 3% for Disabled including blind, deaf and handicapped people as well.

Ex-Member of Parliament, BJP from Chandigarh, Shri Satpal Jain assured the association for the support and raising their voice in the Govt. for getting full support.

Shri Deepak Sharma from BJP Cell said that it's a unique experience for me to be the part of this event and these people use the language of heart for communication, which is far better than other languages.

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Location: USI, New Delhi    Projects: Accessibility
NATIONAL WORKSHOP ON GOOD PRACTICES IN THE AREA OF EMPLOYMENT AND ACCESSIBILITY

The focus is on Employment. Case studies being presented by M. Srinivasulu from Andhra Pradesh, Arman Ali from Assam, Nita Panchal from Gujarat, Javed Ahmad Tak from Jammu & Kashmir, Kanchan Pamnani & Ketan Kothari from Maharashtra, Anuradha B. and Pradeep Raj from New Delhi, and Dr. Sruti Mohapatra from Orissa. Rama Chari of DEOC is the expert for the day. NCPEDP is pleased to organise this event in collaboration with Handicap International - India. Tomorrow the focus will be on Accessibility.

DAY 1: This workshop is an offshoot of the Making it Work project of Handicap International in Gujarat. Under this project, they are working with Disability Advocacy Group (DAG), Gujarat on documenting good practices on employment and accessibility in the State. DAG is a member of the National Disability Network (NDN). DAG and HI wanted to bring these case studies from Gujarat to the national platform to get inputs and feedback from other States. Day 1 of the workshop was on employment. As part of the knowledge sharing endeavour of NDN, several NDN partners presented case studies from their States. Case studies on employment were presented by M. Srinivasulu from Andhra Pradesh, Arman Ali from Assam, Nita Panchal from Gujarat, Javed Ahmad Tak from Jammu & Kashmir, Kanchan Pamnani & Ketan Kothari from Maharashtra, Anuradha B. and Suvarna Raj from New Delhi, and Dr. Sruti Mohapatra from Orissa. Rama Chari of DEOC is the expert for the sessions on employment.

DAY 2: The workshop focussed on accessibility. Apart from the presentations from Gujarat by Disability Advocacy Group (DAG), there were case studies presented by Balbir Guleria from CORD, Himachal Pradesh; Javed Ahmad Tak from Jammu & Kashmir; Ketan Kothari & Kanchan Pamnani from Maharashtra; Pradeep Raj from Delhi; Geeta Chaturvedi from VISHWAS, Haryana; Dr. Ram Goel and Mridu Goel from Uttar Pradesh; and Dr. Sruti Mohapatra from Odisha. The expert for the day was Shivani Gupta.

Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD, Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD & Mr. Sachin, Member of NAD & Deaf Individual from Lucknow participated in the Workshop.

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Location: Auditorium, PHD Chamber of Commerce & Industry, PHD House, Sector 31-A, Chandigarh    Projects: Deaf Youth
State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth

We have also been able to successfully conduct the State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Youth at Auditorium, PHD Chamber of Commerce & Industry, PHD House, Sector 31-A, Chandigarh on 13th May, 2014.

The seminar started with the welcome note by Mr. Yogesh Kumar, Public Relation Officer of NAD. Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD talked to the audience that he shared the problems of human rights for the deaf in India. Mr. Ashish Doval, Deaf Youth Team of NAD shared the powerpoint presentation about the experience of NAD. Mr. Rahul Garg, NAD’s Deaf Youth Team explained the meaning of the attitude powerpoint presentation. Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD explained about the importance of the attitude in deaf people’s lives need to be changed. Mr. Dilip Jangir, Executive Member (a unit of Rajasthan) & Mr. Jagdip Singh Sodhi, Executive Member (a unit of Punjab) of NAD shared how much they took their time to learn themself being better then they could help deaf others.

Mr. Rahul Garg and Mr. Ashish Doval, NAD's Deaf Youth Team organised a one on one question-answer round where N.A.D. was supposed to answer questions asked by the participants, any questions regarding their functioning, administration, fund raising, etc. This session led to trust building between the organisation and its members. There are about 175 deaf young people from Himachal Pradesh, Punjab & Haryana participated in the Workshop. They are a lot of excitement by our workshop.

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Location: Indian Social Institute, Lodhi Road, New Delhi    Projects: RPWD
National Workshop on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities Bill 2014

Organised by National Association of the Deaf on 12th to 13th April 2014 at Indian Social Institute, 10, Institutional Area, Lodi Road, New Delhi, the workshop summarizes the perspectives of the different 75 deaf leaders from all over the country on the desired revisions of the RPWD 2014 bill before it becomes into an Act.

Mr Javid Abidi - address through video with ISL interpretation.

Mr Abidi stated the condition of the disabled in India post Independence. With no laws the disabled were marginalized at all times and everywhere. Things began to move with the 1995 PWD ACT, however this was mostly on paper. In time due to the hard work of DRG, NCEDP India ratified the UNCRPD in 2007. Again DRG and NCEDP worked diligently and asked the government to draft a new law which in 2011 culminated in the RPWD Bill. The 1995 PWD Act recognized only physical disabilities. However the RPWD Bill recognized mental disabilities also and provided rights for people with mental disabilities for the very first time in India. Many disability groups looked at the RPWD bill with only their personal interests in mind and opposed the Bill. This resulted in divisions in the Disability community, difference of opinion, created doubts in the minds of many and today it is at the standing committee awaiting the approval after a new government is formed. The RPWD bill 2013 has so many benefits even for the deaf. Section 41 on access to information and communication technology says that the government should ensure that persons with disabilities have access to electronic media by providing sign language interpretation and close captioning. Sections 15 and 16 also ensure that education to the deaf is provided in the most appropriate means of communication and that teachers should be trained in sign language. Therefore, this bill had many positive points. We are going to keep fighting now to get this bill passed in the parliament.

Dr. Madan Vasishta address through Video.

The PwD act of 1995 was not very powerful and did not have many benefits. I hope the RPWD bill gets passes in the parliament. I had a discussion with a deaf lawyer here about the RPWD bill. He said there are a number of good points.

The most important thing to remember is to have access for Deaf.

  1. Sign Language Interpreters
  2. Close Captioning
  3. Accessible and Quality Education for Deaf
  4. Relay services

With the above mentioned services and access to information, communication every Deaf individual can be an active and equal citizen of any country. If Dr Madan Vasishta did not have access to sign language interpreter services he would not have been able to complete his Phd, he would not have been able to head educational institutions in America. The same needs to happed in India too. Education is very important. Deaf need education to get jobs. There should be schools and colleges so that the deaf can study, and get degrees and jobs.

In America, the Americans with Disabilities Act was passes in 1990 which had provisions for interpreters, close captioning, etc. The deaf benefitted from the provision of these services and were able to develop. Today here in America, we have deaf professors, teachers, actors, lawyers, doctors, etc. A deaf person has access to all services and can do whatever they want to do and develop.

Mr. Aqil Chinoy - Accessibility: Communication and Technology

Drove down the message - accessibility in communication is the most important aspect for the Deaf community. The current requirements for access to communication with long term benefits

  1. Interpreters
  2. Technology like VRS, close captioning, etc.

Further more after a scrutinizing the RPWD Bill and comparing it with the UNCRPD the following aspects came to light.

  1. The UNCRPD defines "languages" to include signed languages but the RPWD 2013 version does not include signed languages. The definition of languages should be included in RPWD.
  2. The UNCRPD defines “freedom of speech” very clearly and includes sign languages and augmentative and augmentative communication (AAC). But the RPWD 2012 version’s definition of “freedom of speech” is very narrow and does not include sign languages and AAC. The definition of AAC in RWPD is also very limited.
  3. For access to information and communication technology, the RPWD draft 2012 version was more elaborate and detailed. The 2013 version does not have many of the points included in the 2012 version.
  4. The UNCRPD has a separate article on accessibility which is not there in RPWD. The UNCRPD provisions for research and development and assistive technologies in article 4 are also missing from the RPWD.
  5. On participation in cultural life, recreation, leisure and sport, the UNCRPD article is detailed and clear. But the RPWD is not specific on which kind of accessibility. Also, UNCRPD’s article 30 clearly recognizes sign languages and deaf culture. But RWPD does not.

The positive aspects of the RPWD Bill:

  1. For accessibility, both UNCRPD and RPWD 2012 mention interpreters and close captioning.
  2. The RPWD draft 2012 has a section on personal mobility, which is one good point in RPWD that is missing in UNCRPD.
  3. There are many benefits for the deaf from the current provisions due to the emphasis on use of technology for information.

Mr. Gyananda Purohit – “Accessibility: RPWD bill 2014”

Mr. Gyananda Purohit focused on the rural development and accessibility issues. Parents in rural areas are hesitant to send their children to schools and hostels in cities that are far.

The Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA) guarantees education for all. But deaf students are put in hearing schools where teachers don’t know sign language. It is better to have deaf people as teachers to teach deaf students. The SSA provides for special schools for children with disabilities. But here also, the completely deaf and blind are refused admission. Only children with low vision or who are hard of hearing are accepted. So this is a problem. But now under MRC, deaf also get reservation.

In MP, there is a department called GAD which can be questioned if the deaf are not given jobs. Unemployed deaf are given an unemployment allowance.

Misuse of Laws by non disabled people for personal benefits by issuance of disability certificates through incorrect means is high. The RPWD Bill needs to be more specific and clear if it aims at working towards providing Rights to Persons with Disabilities. At the same time the disabled communities , the Deaf need to educate themselves with the laws so that they can question the authorities if they are being discriminated. Renting of apartments, accessibility in communication , information for Deaf in prison, hostels, hotels etc has still not been looked into. The isolated deaf in rural areas are not even fluent sign language users to protect their rights one needs to reach out to them as well.

Dr. Melissa G. Wallang – “Accessibility and Deafness”

The main barrier for deaf people is communication. Accessibility is of three types:

  1. Physical and built environments
  2. Transportation
  3. Information and technology

UNCRPD emphasizes on communication. Communication is a two-way process between a speaker and a hearer. Language is the foundation of communication. Communication can be in many forms – writing, speaking, signing, etc. The deaf have been excluded from life, they have been isolated and have no access to information in the hearing world.

UNCRPD acknowledges that communication systems can be of many varieties. Most events and programs on deaf celebration days gift hearing aids to the deaf children. But hearing aids are not the complete solution. Example, when there is thunder, hearing aids can hurt the ear. We need to ask ourselves what do we need. How do we see ourselves? Do we see ourselves as someone who needs hearing aids? With sign language, we can have communication access. And with communication access, we can access justice, health, science and technology, media, etc. and most importantly with sign language we can access education.

National Curriculum Framework 2005 (NCF) says that according to law, sign language and braille should be used in schools and teachers should be trained in ISL. The disability issue here comes under the concept of inclusive education. The NCF text books have one page on ISL which is not enough. NCERT keeps changing the curriculum. It becomes difficult to keep up with the changes and adapt the books in Braille or in Sign Language. Again Deaf children are being mainstreamed and it’s a major task to reach out to the teachers of mainstream education. The special educators of the Deaf are not very open to learning Sign Language. So do you think that RPWD can change the situation? Can it bring sign language into schools? The law should clearly say what sign language means – that it has a grammar. Just saying that it is a language is not enough.

We should not see ourselves as a disabled people. We should see ourselves as a community speaking a different language. If the government gives funds to develop textbooks and other material in the minority languages and also protects these languages, then the government should also protect ISL and develop material in ISL.

Mr. Sunil Sahasrabudhe – “Deaf Education and Deaf Ways of Educating Deaf Children”

How do we teach deaf children? The Deaf way of teaching relates to Deaf culture and sign language.

Javed Abidi stated that the 2012 RPWD for deaf education mentions sign language however Sunil disagrees. Just knowledge of sign language for teachers is not enough. Sign language is included in AAC but only sign language is not important. The most important key in Deaf Education is Sign Bilingual Education for the Deaf. Oralism per se is fine but should not be taught in schools or be the main focus in schools. Sign language plus reading and writing, developing literacy of Deaf children is important. Teachers need to have subject knowledge and clear concepts, the skills to convey these in sign language to deaf children.

The 1995 PwD act had provisions for special schools. However looking at the RPWD Bill the emphasize is on inclusive education. Inclusive education may work well for children with other disabilities, however it is not suitable for deaf children, it does not work as effectively as it has been thought to be. In a classroom, an interpreter alone is not enough. For deaf children, we need deaf schools where a Deaf child will understand the Deaf culture, his identity with the community, learn, use and excel in his language – sign language. The RPWD also encourages higher education but does not mention interpreters in colleges. Interpreters are necessary for higher education of the deaf.

Dr. Surinder P. K. Randhawa – “Education of the deaf in the light of the RPWD”

As a teacher of the Deaf for many years Dr Randhawa realized that teaching Deaf children through Oralism was not a total success. Children failed to learn, and ironically they had a separate way of communicating among themselves and understood each other very well through sign language. However the B.Ed Special Education (HI) course does not even mention sign language as an option for communicating with Deaf. Around 50% deaf are oral and have no experience and knowledge of sign language and deaf culture, therefore it is hard to give proof to the government of deaf community, deaf culture and sign language.

The RPWD talks about inclusive education, but government schools are in a very poor condition with little infrastructure and material. This poses a major problem. The PwD Act had many provisions, however there was not enough awareness among parents and teacher of Deaf of these provisions.

Close scrutiny of the UNCRPD and RPWD Bill the following observations were made.

  1. UNCRPD ensures secondary and tertiary education for people with disabilities. But the RPWD does not touch this topic in the same way.
  2. Chapter 3 of RPWD Bill on education mentions building accessibility but not communication accessibility. It also mentions monitoring of attainment levels but the reality would be different. Deaf children attend schools but there is very little learning taking place. Who would be accountable for this?
  3. Both special education and inclusive education for the deaf have failed for various reasons. In special schools spoken language is used but the requirement is sign language. In inclusive set-ups, teachers are given only a few days training which is not enough.
  4. Point 5 acknowledges the special needs of deaf and blind but only says that education of the persons who are blind or deaf or both should be imparted in the most appropriate language and modes and means of communication. Here there is only a reference to the specific needs but there is no clarity about those specific needs and it does not mention the need for use of sign language or special schooling if needed.
  5. Clause 16 (g) mentions assistive devices but hearing aids are not very useful in a noisy environment. There is no mention of instructional material in ISL or support services in the form of interpreters.
  6. Section 17 is about adult education, however we need to talk about secondary, tertiary and pri primary education. There needs to be clarity in the provisions and choices.
  7. Chapter 4 on skill development and chapter 5 on social security and health also, there needs to be specific mention of interpreters. The Americans with Disabilities Act has a separate chapter on telecommunication services for the deaf. The Individual Disabilities Education Act in US also mentions TTY services.
  8. The Right to Education Act 2009 also focusses on the age group 6-14 years and ignores the crucial early years from 0-6 years and higher education which are very important.
  9. In chapter 8 on duties of the government, points 39, 40 and 41 also need to mention sign language’s benefit for the deaf. Point 46 on human resource development should add interpreters.
  10. Chapter 2 on ethics is good and important as deaf themselves can become members of ethics committee to safeguard research ethics while working with deaf communities or sign language. Currently, research grants are given to hearing researchers and there is little involvement of the deaf, and they are not aware of the research taking place.

Mrs. Renuka Rameshan – “Clauses in the RPWD bill 2014”

Section 37 on education in RPWD 2011 talks about inclusive education. The section implies that teachers would be trained in ISL and that there would also be professional interpreters for educational purposes available in the classroom. The clauses talking about education to blind and deaf children in the most appropriate means of communication for them should specify braille and sign language. Another addition could be to make necessary adjustments such as IEPs (Individualized Education Program) as mentioned in the Americans with Disabilities Act 1990.

There need to be measures to ensure that the clauses are implemented and programs to teach and train teachers of deaf should be in place and they should be effective. There also needs to be an emphasis on interpreter training, license for interpreters, and a revised syllabus/course in the sign language interpreting course.

Mr.Sujit Sahasrabudhe “Understanding the diversity of hearing loss and how it applies to employment”

In India, the possibility of employment is linked to hearing loss levels. The terms used in India – Hearing Impaired and Hearing Handicapped – are not used internationally now since they focus on the loss. The term “Hearing disabled” is used internationally. Hearing impairment (HI) and speech impairment (SI) are different and not related to each other. SI is not related to hearing loss.

Comparing the PwD 1995 and the various versions of the RPWD with regard to definitions and reservations for jobs. The definitions in the 2011 version were simple and clear. The 2012 version added a new category of speech and language disability. For reservations for jobs, there is 1% reservation for HI and SI in the 2013 version. Here the meaning of “and” is not clear. In the 1995 act, the term was just HI which was clear but the RPWD versions’ terms are complex and confusing.

Sujit asked the gathering the following –

  • Do you want that there should be a division between HI and HOH? If yes, why?
  • Are the terms HI and deaf same or different?
  • We need to identify jobs that are suitable for deaf and HOH.

Sujit ended his session by stating we need to accept the diversity of hearing loss and call all deaf.

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Location: Indian Social Institue, 10 Institutional Area, Lodi Road, New Delhi    Projects: Deaf Women
State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Women

The State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Women was held on 30th March, 2014 at Indian Social Institute, 10 Institutional Area, Lodi Raod, New Delhi organised by National Association of the Deaf. It was a one day long workshop on empowerment of deaf women from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

The workshop started with the welcome note by Ms. Nirupama Kaul, Committee Deaf Women Member of NAD.

Smt. Geeta Sharma is a deaf person and also, the Woman Secretary of National Association of the Deaf, New Delhi. She starts the workshop every month to conduct the workshop for deaf women for NCR/Delhi.

She made various presentations referring to deaf women. Deaf women leaders attended the workshop from Delhi/NCR. Most were enthusiastic and keen to have learnt things presented by Smt. Geeta Sharma and also Smt. Reena Jain who is a Committee Deaf Women Member of NAD.

Dr. Lucky Chandekar, Gynecologist at Surbhi Hospital, Noida took an interactive session on 'Menstruation' through an informative PPT presentation. The session jogged many participants’ brains and solved / addressed all queries of deaf women.

Ms. Abha Bisht, Bachelor of Arts Applied Sign Language Studies was invited to be lecturer to deaf women. She has shown her powerpoint presentantation to them about domestic violence and women issues.

Programme was held in order to raise awareness and create a positive space in society for the deaf community, women's issues and women's health issues. 65 deaf women attended the workshop in Delhi.

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Location: Thapar University, Patiala, Punjab    Projects: RPWD
State Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

We organized the third kind of State Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) between 15th & 16th March, 2014 at Auditorium, Thapar University, Patiala, Punjab between 9:30 am to 5:00 pm. There were about 90 deaf delegates from all over Patiala, Punjab attended the workshop for two days. Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD, and Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD shared the different PowerPoint Presentations about the Human Rights on Video, the human rights/laws, & UNCRPD.

It was necessary to have awareness on UNCRPD to help deaf people understand and know the laws and rights of the deaf. It helps to empower them to do themselves by their own decision in their lives in India.

A milestone for the advocacy of the rights of persons with disabilities is now steadily gaining worldwide acceptance and support. This is known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) refers to a document focusing on international human rights of people with disabilities. It was created by the United Nations and is being monitored by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 13, 2006. The Convention was opened for signature on March 30, 2007. It then came into force on May 3, 2008, after the Convention’s ratification by the 20th party. There are a total of 71 countries that have ratified the convention. Some of the countries that have ratified the Convention include Australia, Belgium, China, India, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, and United Kingdom and Northern Ireland. The UN.org website has a section where interested groups and individuals can read the latest developments regarding the convention.

The Convention intends to ensure equal rights to people with disabilities. This is done by elaborating in detail the rights of persons with disabilities and setting out a code of implementation.

Guiding Principles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities:-

Eight principles form the base for the Convention and the articles included in it. Below are the guiding principles:

  • Respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy including the freedom to make one's own choices, and independence of persons
  • Non-discrimination
  • Full and effective participation and inclusion in society
  • Respect for difference and acceptance of persons with disabilities as part of human diversity and humanity
  • Equality of opportunity
  • Accessibility
  • Equality between men and women
  • Respect for the evolving capacities of children with disabilities and respect for the right of children with disabilities to preserve their identities

India ratified UNCRPD on the 1st of October, 2007. India was the 7th country in the world and the first significant country to do so. The ratification of UNCRPD was a direct result of the advocacy by NCPEDP and Disabled Rights Group (DRG).

UNCRPD is an international instrument that provides persons with disabilities the same human rights that everyone else enjoys. It marks a radical shift in defining and understanding disability - it moves from a medical/social perspective to a human-rights based approach.

However, UNCRPD is just a paper if it is not implemented. Disabled people have to play an active role in the implementation and monitoring of UNCRPD.

For each change to make the lives of more than 18 million deaf Indians better, we need to understand this international treaty on which the new disability bill is based on.

650 million people, roughly 10 per cent of the world's population, live with a disability, according to the United Nations. In India alone, there are roughly 100 million people with disabilities, which is almost 1/6th of population of disabled people in the world.

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State Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

We organized the first kind of the State Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) between 17th & 18th February, 2014 at Auditorium, Hotel, Bathinda, Punjab between 9:30 am to 5:00 pm. There were about 75 deaf delegates from all over Bathinda, Punjab attended the workshop for two days. Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD, and Mr. Ram Singh, Co-Worker of NAD shared the different PowerPoint Presentations about the Human Rights on Video, the human rights/laws, & UNCRPD.

We organized the second kind of the State Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) between 2nd & 3rd March, 2014 at Auditorium, Punjab University of Agriculture, Ludhiana, Punjab between 9:30 am to 5:00 pm. There were about 87 deaf delegates from all over Ludhiana, Punjab attended the workshop for two days. Mr. A. S. Narayanan, Secretary of NAD, Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD, and Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD shared PowerPoint Presentations about the Human Rights on Video, the human rights/laws, & UNCRPD.

We organized the third kind of State Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) between 15th & 16th March, 2014 at Auditorium, Thapar University, Patiala, Punjab between 9:30 am to 5:00 pm. There were about 90 deaf delegates from all over Patiala, Punjab attended the workshop for two days. Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD, and Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD shared the different PowerPoint Presentations about the Human Rights on Video, the human rights/laws, & UNCRPD.

It was necessary to have awareness on UNCRPD to help deaf people understand and know the laws and rights of the deaf. It helps to empower them to do themselves by their own decision in their lives in India.

A milestone for the advocacy of the rights of persons with disabilities is now steadily gaining worldwide acceptance and support. This is known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) refers to a document focusing on international human rights of people with disabilities. It was created by the United Nations and is being monitored by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 13, 2006. The Convention was opened for signature on March 30, 2007. It then came into force on May 3, 2008, after the Convention’s ratification by the 20th party. There are a total of 71 countries that have ratified the convention. Some of the countries that have ratified the Convention include Australia, Belgium, China, India, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, and United Kingdom and Northern Ireland. The UN.org website has a section where interested groups and individuals can read the latest developments regarding the convention.

The Convention intends to ensure equal rights to people with disabilities. This is done by elaborating in detail the rights of persons with disabilities and setting out a code of implementation.

Guiding Principles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities:-

Eight principles form the base for the Convention and the articles included in it. Below are the guiding principles:

  • Respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy including the freedom to make one's own choices, and independence of persons
  • Non-discrimination
  • Full and effective participation and inclusion in society
  • Respect for difference and acceptance of persons with disabilities as part of human diversity and humanity 
  • Equality of opportunity
  • Accessibility
  • Equality between men and women
  • Respect for the evolving capacities of children with disabilities and respect for the right of children with disabilities to preserve their identities

India ratified UNCRPD on the 1st of October, 2007. India was the 7th country in the world and the first significant country to do so. The ratification of UNCRPD was a direct result of the advocacy by NCPEDP and Disabled Rights Group (DRG).

UNCRPD is an international instrument that provides persons with disabilities the same human rights that everyone else enjoys. It marks a radical shift in defining and understanding disability - it moves from a medical/social perspective to a human-rights based approach.

However, UNCRPD is just a paper if it is not implemented. Disabled people have to play an active role in the implementation and monitoring of UNCRPD.

For each change to make the lives of more than 18 million deaf Indians better, we need to understand this international treaty on which the new disability bill is based on.

650 million people, roughly 10 per cent of the world's population, live with a disability, according to the United Nations. In India alone, there are roughly 100 million people with disabilities, which is almost 1/6th of population of disabled people in the world.

Photo Gallery

Location: Hotel Amsun Pride, Amrik Singh Road, Bathinda (Punjab)    Projects: RPWD
State Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

We organized the first kind of the State Deaf Workshop on UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) between 17th & 18th February, 2014 at Hotel Amsun Pride, Amrik Singh Road, Bathinda (Punjab) between 9:30 am to 5:00 pm. There were about 75 deaf delegates from all over Bathinda, Punjab attended the workshop for two days. Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD, and Mr. Ram Singh, Co-Worker of NAD shared the different PowerPoint Presentations about the Human Rights on Video, the human rights/laws, & UNCRPD.

It was necessary to have awareness on UNCRPD to help deaf people understand and know the laws and rights of the deaf. It helps to empower them to do themselves by their own decision in their lives in India.

A milestone for the advocacy of the rights of persons with disabilities is now steadily gaining worldwide acceptance and support. This is known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) refers to a document focusing on international human rights of people with disabilities. It was created by the United Nations and is being monitored by the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 13, 2006. The Convention was opened for signature on March 30, 2007. It then came into force on May 3, 2008, after the Convention's ratification by the 20th party. There are a total of 71 countries that have ratified the convention. Some of the countries that have ratified the Convention include Australia, Belgium, China, India, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, and United Kingdom and Northern Ireland. The UN.org website has a section where interested groups and individuals can read the latest developments regarding the convention.

The Convention intends to ensure equal rights to people with disabilities. This is done by elaborating in detail the rights of persons with disabilities and setting out a code of implementation.

Guiding Principles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities:-

Eight principles form the base for the Convention and the articles included in it. Below are the guiding principles:

  • Respect for inherent dignity, individual autonomy including the freedom to make one's own choices, and independence of persons
  • Non-discrimination
  • Full and effective participation and inclusion in society
  • Respect for difference and acceptance of persons with disabilities as part of human diversity and humanity
  • Equality of opportunity
  • Accessibility
  • Equality between men and women
  • Respect for the evolving capacities of children with disabilities and respect for the right of children with disabilities to preserve their identities

India ratified UNCRPD on the 1st of October, 2007. India was the 7th country in the world and the first significant country to do so. The ratification of UNCRPD was a direct result of the advocacy by NCPEDP and Disabled Rights Group (DRG).

UNCRPD is an international instrument that provides persons with disabilities the same human rights that everyone else enjoys. It marks a radical shift in defining and understanding disability - it moves from a medical/social perspective to a human-rights based approach.

However, UNCRPD is just a paper if it is not implemented. Disabled people have to play an active role in the implementation and monitoring of UNCRPD.

For each change to make the lives of more than 18 million deaf Indians better, we need to understand this international treaty on which the new disability bill is based on.

650 million people, roughly 10 per cent of the world's population, live with a disability, according to the United Nations. In India alone, there are roughly 100 million people with disabilities, which is almost 1/6th of population of disabled people in the world.

Photo Gallery

Location: Commonwealth Youth Program, Asia Centre, Sector 12, Chandigarh    Projects: Awareness RPWD
Workshop on the Advocacy Training for the Deaf

We organized the Workshop on the “Advocacy Training for the Deaf” at Commonwealth Youth Program, Asia Centre, Sector 12, Chandigarh on 21st July, 2013. There were about 45 deaf students and 25 deaf members from all over Chandigarh participating in the Workshop.

The workshop started with the welcome note by Mr. Yogesh Kumar, Public Relation Officer of NAD. Mr. Anuj Jain, Joint Secretary of NAD, and Mrs. Geeta Sharma, Women Secretary of NAD shared their experiences & explained the issues of Government of India, Legal Purpose, Basic UNCRPD and showed the PowerPoint presentation about advocacy to deaf delegates. Mr. Vishal Arora, Treasurer of NAD organised fun games for deaf delegates which led to a good time.

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Location: Vishwa Yuwa Kendra, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi    Projects: Deaf Women
5th National Deaf Women Empowerment Seminar

National Association of the Deaf in association with National Commission for Women organised the 5th National Deaf Women Empowerment Seminar on 6th – 7th December 2013 at Yuva Vishwa Kendra, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi. Approximately 150 women from different states participated in the Seminar.

Kumari Selja, Honourable Minister for Social Justice and Empowerment graced the inauguration ceremony of the seminar as the Chief Guest along with the Guest of Honour, Smt. Mamta Sharma, Chairperson of National Commission for Women. The Minister during her speech acknowledged the delay in setting up the Indian Sign Language Research and Training Centre and assured that the Centre will be set up at the earliest next year.

She also plans to start the process of setting up the first College for the Deaf in Delhi as quality education is the foundation of empowerment. Lastly, the Minister also confirmed that the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Bill 2012 will soon be finalised and come to fruition next year- a better future for the disability sector.

The Chairperson, NCW was amazed at seeing a large gathering of deaf women. She expressed her concern that a lot of work needs to be done for the rural sector. She requested the Minister to consider suggesting reservations for women including women with disabilities at the Parliamentary Sessions as well. She promised to initiate a special Cell that’ll deal the issues of women with disabilities.

Location: Wazirabad, Delhi    Projects: Awareness
Sign Language Program for Delhi Police Training School

National Association of the Deaf Team joined the students from Cluster Innovation Centre (CIC), University of Delhi in addressing Delhi Police personnel on the 31st October, 2013 at Police Training School, Wazirabad, Delhi. The response was tremendous and the Delhi police are keen to implement certain changes in their working. They are willing to include Indian Sign Language as part of their training module to enable police personnel to interact with deaf and mute people who approach them. Mrs. Sukrita Paul Kumar, Programme Coordinator, CIC University of Delhi hope for active participation from National Association of the Deaf in our student project on Sign Language in formulating this training module. CIC is also preparing a list of official interpreters with their contact details to be handed to the Commissioner, Delhi Police that could be circulated to all the police stations for ready reference.

The program was organized by Cluster Innovation Centre of the University of Delhi (CIC)and attended by around 400 Police Personnel had attended the event.

Mr. Anuj Jain (Joint Secretary), Ms. Sonia Bhatia (Program Officer), Rahul Garg & Rishikesh Anand (co-workers) of National Association of the Deaf performed a skit on common incidents like robbery and rape. The skit was performed in a contrasting manner where one was acted out without the assistance on a sign language interpreter and the second scenario was with an interpreter. The contrast was visible to all the cadets. The confusion, misunderstandings that existed in the first scenario due to communication gap between the police officer and victim and that gap was solved through the presence of a sign language interpreter in the second scenario. This skit sent a powerful message on the importance of promotion of Indian Sign language.

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Location: National Institute of Speech and Hearing at Akkulam, Kerala    Projects: Education
Workshop on Preparing The Deaf Student for Higher Education

National Association of the Deaf Secretary A.S. Narayanan has said that there is an urgent need to include Sign Language in the education system of deaf students from the primary stages.

He was speaking at the three-day workshop on ‘Preparing The Deaf Student for Higher Education’ at the National Institute of Speech and Hearing (NISH), Akkulam, here.

Inaugurating the workshop, Director of Public Instructions A.Shajahan said that opportunities are low for deaf people. “However, it is possible to give an overview of the opportunities available in the country for the deaf students. They should be able to continue their higher studies and get good jobs in future,’’ Shajahan said.

NISH Executive Director Samuel N. Mathew said that the need of the hour is to think about innovative ways to help deaf students emerge successful in their lives. “The revolution which starts in NISH should spread to different parts of India,’’ he said.

The issues of teaching deaf students at degree level, the need for reviewing the degree programme, teaching deaf students and so on are being discussed in the three day workshop.

Experts from various schools and colleges conducting deaf education across India are the main speakers. The three day workshop will conclude on July 26.

Location: Commonwealth Youth Program, Asia Centre, Sector 12, Chandigarh    Projects: Deaf Youth
Workshop on the Advocacy Training for the Deaf

We organized the Workshop on the “Advocacy Training for the Deaf” at Commonwealth Youth Program, Asia Centre, Sector 12, Chandigarh on 21st July, 2013. There were about 55 deaf delegates from all over Punjab participating in the Workshop.

The workshop started with the welcome note by Mr. Yogesh Kumar, Public Relation Officer of NAD. Mr. A.S. Narayanan shared his experiences & explained the issues of Government of India, Legal Purpose and showed the PowerPoint presentation about advocacy to deaf delegates. Mr. Bharat Sharma, co-worker of NAD organised fun ice-break games for deaf leaders which led to a good time.

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Location: Bathinda, Punjab    Projects: Awareness
Advocacy Workshop for the Deaf in Bhatinda with SSP and DSP

Mr. Yogesh Kumar, Public Relation Officer, National Association of the Deaf organised the Advocacy Workshop for the Deaf in Bhatinda, Punjab on 30th June, 2013. There were about 55 deaf people who attended the workshop. Mr. Yogesh Kumar and his wife met SSP and PPS from Bhatinda, Punjab on 30th June, 2013. They have opened a way for us to communicate through SMS and E-mail. SSP and PPS can help deaf in any problem Civil & Political Right, Domestic Violence, Rape, Social Security, Property Right, Prevent from Abuse and Torture, Harassment etc. The deaf people can ask their problems to SSP and PPS through SMS mobile number 09815800301 and E-mail:-ssp.btd.police@punjab.gov.in

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Location: New Delhi    Projects: Accessibility
Children of Deaf Adults Workshop (CODA)

National Association of the Deaf organised the Children of Deaf Adults Workshop (CODA) on 6th January, 2013 at Indian Social Institute, Lodhi Road, New Delhi. Over 15 children of deaf adults participated in this workshop which was led by Mr. Kevin J. Nolan, (Gallaudet University’s Gerald “Bummy” Burstein Institute, Washington DC, USA) & Dr. Madan Vasishta, Chief Advisory, Indian Sign Language Research & Training Centre.

Both Mr. Kevin and Dr. Vasishta took a session with children of deaf adults (CODA) discussing how the deaf world and hearing world is different and children bridge that gap. Children had their doubts cleared, had some back and forth questions for their parents moderated by Mr. Kevin.

This workshop took a more practical approach with a lot of brainstorming which had left a positive impact on our hearing children and we hope that next one would be the same kind and better!

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Location: New Delhi    Projects: Awareness
4th National Workshop on the Grassroots Deaf Leadership 2013

National Association of the Deaf organised the 4th National Workshop on the Grassroots Deaf Leadership from 5th to 8th January 2013 at Indian Social Institute, Lodhi Road, New Delhi. Over 85 participants including deaf students participated in this workshop which was led by Mr. Kevin J. Nolan, (Gallaudet University’s Gerald “Bummy” Burstein Institute, Washington DC, USA).

Mr. Nolan showed a testimonial video of his brother who is deaf and how much he had to struggle to get into the Military and his journey which inspired our participants that nothing is impossible. This workshop opened eyes of our participants in exploring the issues that limit the participation of deaf persons in society and day to day life and how we can combat, fight these issues by dividing the participants into groups. N.A.D. is an advocacy organisation, and took suggestions from the participants which will be helping in their work. Mr. Kevin organised a one on one question-answer round where N.A.D. was supposed to answer questions asked by the participants, any questions regarding their functioning, administration, fund raising, etc. This session led to trust building between the organisation and its members. Throughout the workshop, we had several group works where brainstorming took place on how an advocacy organisation works, what qualities take to be a leader, a loyal follower and how we can create visibility for the deaf community which will lead to the Government allot resources accordingly. 

Dr. Madan Vasishta, Chief Advisor of Indian Sign Language Research and Training Centre (I.S.L.R.T.C.) took a session on Emotional Intelligence explaining how one is supposed to react calmly during intense situations. We even had Smt. Pooja Parvati, Research Coordinator of Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability who provided a basic session on how the Government budget works, how the disability budget is decided and so on. Budget is a new concept which was introduced to the disability community couple of years ago and it is still a new concept for the deaf community. Another session on Right to Information Act 2005 was led by Shri Javed Abidi, Convenor of Disability Rights Group. This session enlightened the participants that they could seek their rightful information from various government agencies and this is a great tool for advocacy organisations to have concrete data and records for their work.

This workshop took a more practical approach with a lot of brainstorming which had left a positive impact on our participants and we hope that next one would be the same kind and better!

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Location: New Delhi Railway Station, New Delhi    Projects: Awareness
CBR Training Program for Porters

Action for Ability Development & Inclusion (AADI), Delhi held a series of trainings for porters (Coolies) at New Delhi, Nizamuddin and Agra Cantt Railway Stations where we were also present from 19th to 24th November, 2012. These training were meant to facilitate porters in assisting persons with varied disabilities. We held 18 such training at different stations side by side. We shared our communication barriers at railway stations especially when all announcements inside the station are auditory. We taught them basic sign language which would make the communication easier with the deaf counterpart. It was an eye opener for us and the porters at how open and willing they were to suggestions and changes and clearing their doubts.

This training was essential because around 1,400 delegates from 75 countries will be travelling from train to Agra, India for the first CBR World Congress in India from 26th to 28th November 2012 which was organised by CBR India Network. The Congress would facilitate and develop/strengthen CBR as a key strategy to reduce poverty and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities and their families, and ensure that the benefits of the convention on the Rights of Person with Disabilities reach majority of the world’s people with disabilities.

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Location: IGNOU, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi    Projects: ISLRTC
1ST FOUNDATION DAY INDIAN SIGN LANGUAGE RESEARCH AND TRAINING CENTRE (ISLRTC)

We were invited to the first foundation day of Indian Sign Language Research and Training Centre (ISLRTC) on 4th October 2012. The Director I/C of ISLRTC, Prof. A.K. Singh welcomed the paneled guests i.e., Shri Gopi Nath Pradhan, Vice-Chancellor of IGNOU, Dr. Madan Vasishta, Chief Advisor of ISLRTC, Shri A.S. Narayanan, Secretary of National Association of the Deaf (NAD), Shri Sibaji Panda, Lecturer of BAASLS and Dr. Hemlata, Coordinator of  BAASLS and the friends of the Deaf Community and students. He invited the guests and two students to light the lamp to start the function.

Before the Director asked Shri Pradhan to address the audience, he asked Dr. Vasishta and Shri Pradhan to present a laptop to a student of BAASLS whom the faculty found hard working, sincere, determined and with a bright future. Shri Pradhan thanked everyone for taking time out and being a part of ISLRTC’s first year of completion. Soon, the advertisement for posts at ISLRTC will be out and we will have experienced staff and faculty along with the sanction by the Ministry of the construction of the ISLRTC building. The dreams of the deaf community will be coming to life and taking shape.

Prof. Singh then invited Shri Narayanan to share his journey. He journeyed through the time when ISLRTC was only a seed of thought, a dream. Many years ago, NAD had started to demand from the Government for a research and training centre of Indian Sign Language. NAD went to various offices of MSJE and MHRD and met with all the high officials in the Planning Commission (PC) to explain the needs of the Deaf community and they were given promises that ‘something will be done’ but no action had been taken. Finally, the 11th Five-Year Plan had an entire chapter on disability. That Plan mandated the setting up of a Sign Language Research and Training Centre, a National Captioning Centre, at least one residential school up to class XII for deaf students in every state and one degree college in every zone, among other things. But, more than two years after the Plan came into force and the implementation had been zero.

Then, NAD demonstrated against this delay. The Deputy Chairman of PC talked to the PM and later met with Shri Mukul Wasnik, Minister of SJ&E, who started the process which led to the final establishment of ISLRTC on 4th October 2011. He couldn’t believe that one year had passed. ISLRTC was and is the result of the hardwork of thousands of deaf people. All of them came out in the streets to demand for the right to use their mother tongue. NAD is thankful to the Government for establishing ISLRTC last year. This is only a beginning. Soon, ISLRTC branches will be all over India. ISL classes will be in towns and villages and all the schools will use ISL for deaf students. All teachers of deaf students will use ISL. This will make communication and learning by deaf children easier. This will also lead to more interpreters. We need 4 lakh interpreters but have only 200 now. New training programmes will help produce quality and proficient interpreters. It will take time but one day, we will have enough qualified interpreters to meet our need. We will have excellent professors and researchers who will research on ISL. We will know more about our language. We must work together to make sure our rights are preserved. ISLRTC has done some good work in the last year and we hope that it does much more in the coming years. The Deaf community must constantly provide its support to ISLRTC.

Prof. Singh said that never had he ever thought that he would be a part of the Deaf community in any way and now he is and he has never enjoyed more than being a part of this community. This vision will be real soon with the constant guidance of Dr. Vasishta and Shri Narayanan, people who talk less but work a lot unlike the professors who talk a lot but work less.

Dr. Madan Vashista mentioned that if it weren't for the advocacy of National Association of the Deaf, we wouldn't even be having ISLRTC in the first place. Without ISLRTC, we cannot teach ISL or even train the hearing teachers of deaf schools or having a state level workshop of sign language interpreters or educate parents about the needs of a deaf child and link them to organisations that can assist in the child's upbringing.

Shri Sibaji Panda shared the same views as Dr. Vashista. He requested the deaf community to constantly give its support to NAD who truly fights for the needs of the Deaf community and is extremely proactive in its work. As for ISLRTC, since it has taken BAASLS under its wings, we hope to be able to reach the students that are unreachable using IGNOU's networks and BAASLS can have more students in the coming years.

The ceremony ended with students dance performances, skits and jokes showing the culture of the Deaf community.

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Location: Fr. Agnel School, Gautam Nagar, Delhi    Projects: Deaf Women
State Level Workshop on Empowerment of Deaf Women

Over 70 women participated in this seminar from Delhi and NCR. Many new faces and most of them were youngsters. Mrs. Deepika Taneja welcomed all of the participants as they all celebrated the last day of International Week of the Deaf and being the last Sunday, they also celebrated International Day of the Deaf. She called upon Ms. Nirupama Kaul to talk on the essence of International Day/Week of the Deaf, Deaf Awareness March and the role of World Federation of the Deaf andUnited Nations in thiscelebrations. Being deaf is an invisible disability which brings a great need for awareness. A deaf person cannot be easily spotted among the crowd, no. This is why every year, the last week of September, we celebrate the International Week of the Deaf. Earlier, since 1951, International Day of the Deaf was celebrated on the last Sunday of September buy few years ago, WFD decided to extend the celebrations to a whole week where the cultural activities performed by the deaf will take place. She further explained the importance of United Nations.

To add further to Ms. Kaul's presentation, Ms. Angel Singha took over the next session to explain the work that United Nations does, its background, the understanding of Human Rights and what is United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). She showed a video from the time when United Nations was established, how it functions, its Head Quarters, etc. Then, she asked the audience the meaning of human rights to them. Few said the freedom to choose but rest were puzzled. Then, she showed another video which was animated on the basic understanding of human rights where a person is respected and has dignity, has a right to education, socialise, capable of making decisions, working, having a family, among many other. United Nations has 9 international treaties among which UNCRPD falls under, she explained. It was designed for persons with disabilities by persons with disabilities. India is the 7th country that ratified UNCRPD on 1st October, 2007. There is a paradigm shift in the disability sector from a medical model to a right based model. She talked on Article 5: Equality and non discrimination which is the crux of CRPD and Article 6 that talks on 'women with disabilities'. She explained the concept of 'reasonable accomodation' which means a temporary fix which is done now and not ten years later. Then she ended her session by showing a movie on a deaf girl who had the will power to play violin. It seems impossible but that's the part, it might seem impossible but it never is.

Then the ladies were divided into five groups and puzzles were given to them. Once assembled, the groups had words like love, faith, hope, etc which is the most important thing for a person to survive. And, lastly, a skit was shown where a pregnant lady is in labour and she has five children, first depicting sign language, second; interpreters, third; IWD, fourth; education and fifth being accessibility. Sign language is the centre and the culture of a deaf community.

Smt. Geeta Sharma,Women Secretary of NAD gave her vote of thanks. She said it was important for us to keep ourselves aware of our surroundings. CRPD is ours and very few people among us knew about its existence. Deaf community is invisible but we need to create awareness otherwise unreached would feel alone, helpless. It is our moral responsibility to reach the unreached. Then, she invited the ladies to join her for coffee and snacks.

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